You need a plan

Sometimes you need a plan. Last night, for instance, we just rode. It was a bit of a mess and I got the raw deal. My legs were hurting from the last few rides and I needed an easy session. I never expected to be out on this ride, hence my effort on Sunday. There were some new people there so I was looking for an easy/social cruise. But we had no leader.

The ride started easy enough and then my brother wound it up (new bike syndrome – Scott Foil 30) . Not wanting to get left behind I kept them in sight and caught up at the Catchup point. I thought that we needed some organisation so I made it obvious that I was counting riders, we started with 15, but the group slowly rolled away. By the time, what I thought, was the last rider came through I was well behind. So with hurting legs and no one to help I set about catching the group, I cut a couple of corners but by the time that I got to the shop I was ready to give up. Just as I thought that my evening was going to be easy the lead group sped by and I was off again trying to catch them. The next lap was much better as I could hide behind all those big guys.

Training tip

You need a plan when you set out and you need a plan if you want to improve. For almost every sport the Golden Rule is: Not more than 10% of your week at Max, not more than 25% at anaerobic threshold and the rest at easy pace. Break this rule and you won’t get any fitter or stronger. Of course you will be in good shape and will burn calories so folks will think you fit, but, you won’t improve. Your rest and recovery are the most important (rebuilding) parts of your ride. I need a break.

Nice to be warm for a change, helping me were my Gore Windsopper AlpX jkt with one base layer and my Northwave Fahrenheit boots. I am convinced now that my 25mm tyres are better then 23mm – faster and more fomfortable.

My ride – short but still hard.

About questadventure

Old git cyclist, road and mountain bike rider and racer, windsurfer, skier, snowboarder, husband, father, bike shop owner, fitness fanatic, cook, linguist.
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